IEEE/CIC International Conference on Communications in China
27-29 July 2016 // Chengdu, China

INVITED TALKS

Session-1
Date: Thursday, July 28, 2016
Time: 11:00-12:30
Room: Sentosa Meeting Room, Wangjiang Club 4F
Chair: Guodong Zhao (University of Electronic Science and Technology of China)

Title:
Recent Advance of Fog Computing Based Radio Access Networks for 5G

Instructor:
Mugen Peng, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China

Compared with the fourth generation cellular systems, the fifth generation (5G) wireless communication systems are anticipated to provide spectral and energy efficiency growth by a factor of at least 10, and the area throughput growth by a factor of at least 25. To achieve these goals, a fog computing based radio access network (F-RAN) is presented recently as the advanced wireless access network paradigm, where edge cloud computing is used to fulfill the distributed cooperative processing and delivering the local content for decreasing the latency and burdens on the fronthaul/backhaul. The state-of-the-art research achievements in aspects of system architecture and key technologies for F-RANs are briefly introduced in this talk. In particular, the system architecture evolution from C-RANs and H-CRANs to F-RANs will be discussed, and the key technologies including the edge cache driven performance analysis and cooperative radio resource allocation will be presented. Some challenges and open issues will be discussed.

Biography of the instructor:

MugenPeng
Mugen Peng, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China

Mugen Peng received the B.E. degree in electronics engineering from the Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing, China, in 2000, and the Ph.D. degree in communication and information systems from the Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications (BUPT), Beijing, China, in 2005. Afterward, he joined BUPT, where he has been a Full Professor with the School of Information and Communication Engineering since 2012. In 2014, he was an Academic Visiting Fellow with Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA. He leads a Research Group focusing on wireless transmission and networking technologies with the Key Laboratory of Universal Wireless Communications (Ministry of Education), BUPT. His main research areas include wireless communication theory, radio signal processing, and convex optimizations, with a particular interests in cooperative communication, self-organization networking, heterogeneous networking, cloud communication, and internet of things. He has authored/coauthored over 60 refereed IEEE journal papers and over 200 conference proceeding papers.

Dr. Peng was a recipient of the 2014 IEEE ComSoc AP Outstanding Young Researcher Award, and the best paper award in IEEE WCNC 2015, WASA 2015, GameNets 2014, IEEE CIT 2014, ICCTA 2011, IC-BNMT 2010, and IET CCWMC 2009. He received the First Grade Award of the Technological Invention Award in the Ministry of Education of China for the hierarchical cooperative communication theory and technologies, and the First Grade Award of Technological Invention Award from the China Institute of Communications for the contributions to the self-organizing networking technology in heterogeneous networks. He is on the Editorial/Associate Editorial Board of the IEEE Communications Magazine, IEEE ACCESS, IET Communications, International Journal of Antennas and Propagation (IJAP), and China Communications. He has been the guest leading editor for the special issues in the IEEE Wireless Communications, IEEE Access, and IET Communications.

Title:
Fundamental Storage-Latency Tradeoff in Cache-Aided Wireless Interference Networks

Instructor:
Meixia Tao, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China

Mobile data traffic has been shifting from connection-centric services, such as voice, e-mails, and web browsing, to emerging content-centric services, such as video streaming, push media, application download/updates, and mobile TV. These contents are typically produced ahead of transmission and can be requested by multiple users at possibly different times. This allows us to cache the contents at base stations or even at user devices during off-peak time, and hence reduce user access latency and alleviating peak-time wireless traffic. A fundamental question is what and how much gain can be leveraged through caching. In this talk, we shall investigate the gain of caching in terms of storage-latency tradeoff in a general wireless interference network with caches equipped at all transmitters (e.g. base stations) and receivers (e.g. user devices). We characterize the tradeoff by an information-theoretic metric, the worst-case fractional delivery time (FDT). We first introduce a novel cooperative transmitter/receiver coded caching strategy. It offers the freedom to adjust file splitting ratios for caching gain optimization. We then present achievable upper bounds of the minimum FDT for the networks with 2 and 3 receivers. We show that receiver local caching gain, coded multicasting gain, and transmitter cooperation gain can be leveraged in different cache size regions by opportunistically turning the interfering network topology into broadcast channel, multicast channel, X channel, or a hybrid form of these channels. We shall also present a theoretical lower bound of the minimum FDT for any number of transmitters and any number of receivers.

Biography of the instructor:

meixiatao
Meixia Tao, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China

Meixia Tao received the B.S. degree from Fudan University, Shanghai, China, in 1999, and the Ph.D. degree from Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in 2003. She is currently a Professor with the Department of Electronic Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China. Prior to that, she was a Member of Professional Staff at Hong Kong Applied Science and Technology Research Institute during 2003-2004, and a Teaching Fellow then an Assistant Professor at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore from 2004 to 2007. Her current research interests include content-centric wireless networks, resource allocation, interference management and coordination, and physical layer security.

Dr. Tao is currently serving as a member of the Executive Editorial Committee of the IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications and an Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Communications. Dr. Tao is the recipient of the IEEE Heinrich Hertz Award for Best Communications Letters in 2013 and the IEEE ComSoc Asia-Pacific Outstanding Young Researcher Award in 2009. She also receives the best paper awards from IEEE/CIC ICCC 2015 and IEEE WCSP 2012.

Title:
Mobility-Aware Caching for Content-Centric Wireless Networks

Instructor:
Jun Zhang, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hongkong

We are witnessing a paradigm shift in wireless networks, from “connection-centric” communications to “content-centric” communications. Caching popular content at the wireless edge has been proposed as an effective approach to catch this trend. In contrast to wired networks, a unique characteristic of content-centric wireless networks (CCWNs) is the mobility of end users. While it has rarely been considered by existing works, user mobility contains various helpful side information that can be exploited to improve caching efficiency. In this talk, a general framework on mobility-aware caching in CCWNs will be presented. A detailed example on caching placement at mobile devices will also be provided to illustrate the proposed design methodology.

Biography of the instructor:

junzhang
Jun Zhang, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hongkong

Jun Zhang (S’06-M’10-SM’15) received the B.Eng. degree in Electronic Engineering from the University of Science and Technology of China in 2004, the M.Phil. degree in Information Engineering from the Chinese University of Hong Kong in 2006, and the Ph.D. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin in 2009. He is currently a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST). His research interests include wireless communications and networking, green communications and computing, and signal processing.

Dr. Zhang co-authored the book Fundamentals of LTE (Prentice-Hall, 2010). He received the 2014 Best Paper Award for the EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing, and the PIMRC 2014 Best Paper Award. Dr. Zhang has been an Editor of IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications since January 2015. He frequently serves on the technical program committees of major IEEE conferences in wireless communications, such as ICC, Globecom, WCNC, VTC, etc., and served as MAC track co-chair for IEEE WCNC 2011.

Session-2
Date: Thursday, July 28, 2016
Time: 11:00-12:30
Room: International Conference Hall, Wufu Building 2F
Chair: Byonghyo Shim (Seoul National University)

Title:
Cell-Edge-Aware Precoding for Downlink Massive MIMO Cellular Networks

Instructor:
Tony Quek, Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore

We propose a cell-edge-aware (CEA) zero forcing (ZF) precoder that exploits the excess spatial degrees of freedom provided by a large number of base station (BS) antennas to suppress inter-cell interference at the most vulnerable user equipments (UEs). We evaluate the downlink performance of CEA-ZF, as well as that of a conventional cell-edge-unaware (CEU) ZF precoder in a network with random base station topology. Our analysis and simulations show that the proposed CEA-ZF precoder outperforms CEU-ZF precoding in terms of (i) aggregate per-cell data rate, (ii) coverage probability, and (iii) 95%-likely, or edge user, rate. This result identifies CEA-ZF as a more effective precoding scheme for massive MIMO cellular networks. Our framework also reveals the importance of scheduling the optimal number of UEs per BS, and confirms the necessity to control the amount of pilot contamination received during the channel estimation phase.

Biography of the instructor:

tony
Tony Quek, Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore

Tony Q.S. Quek received the B.E. and M.E. degrees in Electrical and Electronics Engineering from Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Japan, respectively. At Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA, he earned the Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Currently, he is a tenured Associate Professor with the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD). He also serves as the deputy director of the SUTD-ZJU IDEA and a Scientist with the Institute for Infocomm Research. His current research topics include heterogeneous networks, smart grid, green communications, wireless security, big data processing, IoT, and cognitive radio.

Dr. Quek has been actively involved in organizing and chairing sessions, and has served as a TPC member in a numerous international conferences. He is serving as the Workshop Chair for IEEE Globecom in 2017. He is currently an Executive Editorial Committee Member for the IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications and an Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Communications. He was Guest Editor for the IEEE Signal Processing Magazine (Special Issue on Signal Processing for the 5G Revolution) in November 2014 and the IEEE Wireless Communications Magazine (Special Issue on Heterogeneous Cloud Radio Access Networks) in June 2015. He is a co-author of the book “Small Cell Networks: Deployment, PHY Techniques, and Resource Allocation” published by Cambridge University Press in 2013 and the book “Cloud Radio Access Networks: Principles, Technologies, and Applications” by Cambridge University Press in 2016.

Dr. Quek received the 2008 Philip Yeo Prize for Outstanding Achievement in Research, the IEEE Globecom 2010 Best Paper Award, the 2012 IEEE William R. Bennett Prize, the IEEE SPAWC 2013 Best Student Paper Award, the IEEE WCSP 2014 Best Paper Award, the IEEE PES General Meeting 2015 Best Paper, and the 2015 SUTD Outstanding Education Awards – Excellence in Research.

Title:
Joint Codebook Assignment and Power Allocation for SCMA Based on Capacity with Gaussian Input

Instructor:
Wen Chen, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China

Sparse Code Multiple Access (SCMA) is a nonorthogonal multi-dimensional spreading technique based on layered codebooks. In SCMA, incoming bits are directly mapped to multi-dimensional codewords of pre-defined codebooks. In comparison to simple repetition of QAM symbols in Low Density Signature (LDS), shaping gain of the multi-dimensional constellation is the main advantage of SCMA for performance improvement. Similar to LDS, SCMA can take the advantage of a near optimal Message Passing Algorithm (MPA) receiver with reasonable complexity. In this paper, the uplink SCMA sum capacity is derived and a specific codebook design method is proposed, which can cancel the effect of the dependency between the non-zero entries of codewords. Under this condition, we study the uplink sum-rate optimization problem. A joint codebook assignment and power allocation method is proposed to achieve a near optimal solution. Simulation results show the significant performance gain of the proposed algorithm.

Biography of the instructor:

wenchen
Wen Chen, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China

Wen Chen, a senior member of IEEE and CIE, a Professor of Electronic Engineering in Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China, where he is also the director of the Institute for Signal Processing and Systems. During 2014-2015, he was the dean of School of Electronic Engineering and Automation, Guilin University of Electronic Technology. His interests cover physical layer communications and cross layer design of communication systems, in which area, he has published more than 70 IEEE journal papers and more than 100 IEEE conference papers.

Prof. Chen received the InnovateAsia 5G Competition Award for contribution in sparse code multiple access in 2015, the WCSP2015 best paper award, and 2015 Shanghai outstanding thesis supervision award. He is selected as an outstanding member of Chinese Institute of Electronics in 2013 and received 3 best papers awards of Chinese Information Theory Society in 2013 and 2014. He is also selected as a Pujiang Excellent Scholars in Shanghai, a New Century Excellent Scholars in China, and awarded the Ariyama Memorial Award.

Prof. Chen has organized many IEEE sponsored conferences. He is the general chairs of IEEE HMWC2013, WiMob2011, ICIS2011, 2010, 2009, ISISE2010, 2009, 2008, WCNIS2010, the TPC chairs of IEEE WiMob 2012, ICCT2012, ICCSC2008, and served many conferences as TPC members.

Title:
Beam Training in Millimeter Wave Communication Systems

Instructor:
Yongming Huang, Southeast University, China

Millimeter Wave (mmWave) communication recently has attracted increasing attention, as it promises realizing extremely high data rate owing to its abundant spectrum resource. Large antenna array is generally required to combat the severe path loss of mmWave channels. In particular, beam alignment is needed to search the best pairs of transmit and receive beams from a finite space which is usually represented by a beam training codebook. In this talk, we discuss efficient beam training for hybrid digital/analog MIMO mmWave systems. Particularly, we present a new design approach of hierarchical training codebook by shaping the pattern of multi-resolution training beams, by which multi-stage beam alignment can be carried out with high efficiency. We also provide performance analysis and reveal that the probability of missing alignment of this approach decreases exponentially with the increasing of SNR and the number of trainings. Numerical results finally confirm its effectiveness and show that this new approach achieves high accuracy beam alignment even in the low SNR regime.

Biography of the instructor:

yongming huang
Yongming Huang, Southeast University, China

Dr. Yongming Huang received the B.S. and M.S. degrees from Nanjing University, China, in 2000 and 2003, respectively. In 2007 he received the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from Southeast University, China. Since March 2007 he has been a faculty in the School of Information Science and Engineering, Southeast University, China, where he is currently a full professor. During 2008-2009, Dr. Huang was visiting the Signal Processing Lab, Electrical Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden. His current research interests include MIMO wireless communications, cooperative wireless communications and millimeter wave wireless communications. He has published over 150 peer-reviewed papers, hold over 30 invention patents, and submitted over 10 technical contributions to IEEE standards. Since 2012, he has served as an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing, and EURASIP Journal on Wireless Communications and Networking. He was selected as the Cheung Kong Young Scholar of Ministry of Education of China in 2015, was the recipient of the best paper awards from the 2012 and 2015 International Conference on Wireless Communications and Signal Processing.

Session-3
Date: Thursday, July 28, 2016
Time: 14:00-15:30
Room: Sentosa Meeting Room, Wangjiang Club 4F
Chair: Guodong Zhao (University of Electronic Science and Technology of China)

Title:
Localization of Internet of Things Network via Euclidean Distance Matrix Completion

Instructor:
Byonghyo Shim, Seoul National University, Korea

Recently, Internet of Things (IoT) has received much attention for its plethora of applications, such as healthcare, surveillance, automatic metering, and environmental monitoring. In order to make a proper reaction to the sensed environmental data, such as fire alarm, energy transfer, and emergency request, accurate acquisition of sensor location map at the data center is of great importance. In this talk, we propose a matrix completion algorithm for sensor map acquisition problem in IoT networks. We briefly go over fundamentals of matrix completion and then explain the proposed Euclidean distance matrix completion algorithm. We show that the proposed algorithm is effective recovering the distance matrix with much smaller measurement than that required by conventional approaches.

Biography of the instructor:

Shim
Byonghyo Shim, Seoul National University, Korea

Byonghyo Shim received the B.S. and M.S. degree in Control and Instrumentation Engineering (currently Electrical Eng.) from Seoul National University (SNU), Seoul, Korea, in 1995 and 1997, respectively, and the M.S. degree in Mathematics and the Ph.D. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Urbana, in 2004 and 2005, respectively. He was with the Department of Electronics Engineering at the Korean Air Force Academy as an Academic Full-time instructor. He also had a short time research position in the DSP group of LG Electronics and DSP R&D Center, Texas Instruments Incorporated, Dallas, TX, in 1997 and 2004, respectively. From 2005 to 2007, he was with the Qualcomm Inc., San Diego, CA as a Senior/Staff Engineer working on CDMA systems. From 2007 to 2014, he was with the School of Information and Communication, Korea University, Seoul, Korea, as an assistance and associate professor. Since September 2014, he has been with the Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Seoul National University, where he is presently an Associate Professor. Dr. Shim was the recipient of the 2005 M. E. Van Valkenburg Research Award from the ECE Department of the University of Illinois and 2010 Hadong Young Engineer Award from IEIE. He is an associate editor of IEEE Wireless Communications Letters (WCL), Journal of Communications and Networks (JCN), and a guest editor of IEEE Journal of Selected Areas in Communications.

Title:
Energy Efficient Design for Tactile Internet

Instructor:
Chenyang Yang, BeiHang University, China

Ensuring the ultra-low end-to-end latency and ultrahigh reliability required by tactile internet is challenging. This is especially true when the stringent Quality-of-Service (QoS) requirement is expected to be satisfied not at the cost of  significantly reducing spectral efficiency and energy efficiency (EE). In this paper, we study how to maximize the EE for tactile internet under the stringent QoS constraint, where both queueing delay and transmission delay are taken into account. We first validate that the upper bound of queueing delay violation probability derived from the effective bandwidth can be used to characterize the queueing delay violation probability in the short delay regime for Poisson arrival process. However, the upper bound is not tight for short delay, which leads to conservative designs and hence leads to wasting energy. To avoid this, we optimize resource allocation that depends on the queue state information and channel state information. Analytical results show that with a large number of transmit antennas the EE achieved by the proposed policy approaches to the EE limit achieved for infinite delay bound, which implies that the policy does not lead to any EE loss. Simulation and numerical results show that even for not-so-large number of antennas, the EE achieved by the proposed policy is still close to the upper bound.

Biography of the instructor:

chenyang yang
Chenyang Yang, BeiHang University, China

Chenyang Yang received her Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Beihang University (formerly Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, BUAA), China, in 1997. She has been a full professor with the School of Electronics and Information Engineering, BUAA since 1999. She has published over 200 papers and filed over 60 patents in the fields of energy efficient transmission, CoMP, interference management, cognitive radio, and relay, etc. She was supported by the 1st Teaching and Research Award Program for Outstanding Young Teachers of Higher Education Institutions by Ministry of Education of China during 1999-2004. She was the chair of Beijing chapter of IEEE Communications Society during 2008-2012, and the MDC chair of APB of IEEE Communications Society during 2011-2013. She has served as TPC Member, TPC co-chair or Track co-chair for IEEE conferences. She has ever served as an associate editor for IEEE Trans. on Wireless Communication, guest editor for IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Signal Processing and IEEE Journal of Selected Areas in Communications. Her recent research interests lie in emerging technologies for future wireless networks.

Title:
Wireless sensor network for structural health monitoring

Instructor:
Guiyun Tian, Newcastle University, UK

This invited talk will review sensors, sensor networks and communications for safety critical infrastructures. After review of non-destructive test and evaluation and ICT infrastructure for health monitoring and data management, several case studies will be reported for structural health monitoring from several EU and NSFC projects. Key issues of sensors, sensor networks, communications, signal processing and data management including potential application will be discussed.

  1. Precise time synchronization among distributed nodes
  2. Distributed compressive sensing and collaborative sensing to reduce communication cost and energy saving
  3. RFID sensing, energy harvesting and cognitive communication
  4. ICT infrastructure for intelligent monitoring, data management and their application

Biography of the instructor:

guiyuntian
Guiyun Tian, Newcastle University, UK

Gui Yun Tian (M’01-SM’03) received the B.Sc. degree in metrology and instrumentation and M.Sc. degree in precision engineering from the University of Sichuan, Chengdu, China, in 1985 and 1988, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree from the University of Derby, Derby, U.K., in 1998. From 2000 to 2006, he was a Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, Reader, Professor, and Head of the group of Systems Engineering, respectively, with the University of Huddersfield, U.K. Since 2007, he has been based at Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K., where he has been Chair Professor in Sensor Technologies. Currently, He is also an adjunct professor with School of Automation Engineering, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China. He has coordinated several research projects from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Royal Academy of Engineering, FP7 and H2020, NSFC, on top of this he also has good collaboration with leading industrial companies such as Airbus, Rolls Royce, BP, nPower, Networkrail and TWI among others.

His major research interests include sensors, wireless sensor networks, non-destructive test and evaluation, structural health monitoring and their application. He has published more than 200 papers with high h-index 39. More publication details can be found in https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=Mh94SyYAAAAJ&hl=en.

Session-4
Date: Thursday, July 28, 2016
Time: 14:00-16:30
Room: International Conference Hall, Wufu Building 2F
Chair: Zan Li (Xidian University)

Title:
Complexity Metrics of High Security Sequence Based on Entropy Theory

Instructor:
Zan Li, Xidian University, China

Nowadays, various jamming, tapping and other attacks become serious threats for the people’s information privacy in business and military applications. The security technologies, such as covert communication, computer science, cryptography, etc., face many new challenges in current daily life. As we know, these security technologies always employ the specific sequence, such as FH sequence, chaotic sequence, cryptographical sequence, etc., to resist attacks, and the complexity, which means the ability to avoid the sequence being reconstructed from the obtained sub-sequence available, is the most important indicator to reflect the sequence’s security. With the growing development in the design of sequence in much wider fields, the well-known complexity measures—the linear complexity (LC), the linear complexity profile (LCP) and the k-error linear complexity (k-error LC)—are widely used but not sufficient to evaluate the complexity of the sequences available, such as the cryptographical sequence and the chaotic sequence families. This talk will introduce some of our works on new complexity metrics of high security sequence based on approximate entropy (ApEn) and fuzzy entropy (FuEn), which make the complexity classification more exact with relatively small amount of data points, and are more robust than the existing complexity metrics. As a result, they could be effectively applied to optimize the sequence to achieve high complexity for the high security technologies.

Biography of the instructor:

zanli
Zan Li, Xidian University, China

Zan Li received the Ph.D. degrees in Communication and information systems from Xidian University, Xi’an, China, in 2006. Currently, she is a professor and Ph.D supervisor of Xidian University. She is also the chair of cognitive and communication signal research center in State Key Laboratory of Integrated Services Networks (ISN) of China. She is IET Fellow,IEEE Senior Member, Fellow of Chinese Institute of Electronics, and the Committee Member of 12th Chinese Youth Federation. She serves as the associated editor of the International Journal of Communications Systems. She holds an important post in many international conferences and serves as the invited speaker for many international conferences. She is the general chair of IEEE CITS 2016 and served as the organizing committee co-chair of IEEE CIT 2014. She also served as the technical program committee member of IEEE GLOBECOM 2015, IEEE ICC 2015, and so on. She was recruited as the Yangtze River scholar of Education Ministry of China and awarded the twelfth “Young Women Scientists Award”, the thirteenth “China Youth Science and Technology Award”, “The May Day Women’s pacesetter”, New Century Excellent Talents in University (NCET) Programmed by Education Ministry of China, and the Young Teacher Fund of China Fok Ying Yung Education Foundation.

Her current research interests include cognitive frequency hopping, wireless communication signal processing, and spectrum sensing. She has presided over more than 40 research projects, including the Major National Science and Technology Projects of China, the National 863 project of China. And she developed meteor trail emergency communication system, frequency hopping anti-jamming chips and electromagnetic spectrum monitoring system based on multiple nodes cooperation, which have been applied in state satellite, ocean-going vessels and other equipment. Up to now, her achievements include 4 provincial science and technology awards, 3 professional academic with the first author, and more than 47 national patents where 34 have been authorized. She also has published more than 140 academic papers in important journals and conferences such as IEEE Trans. on Communications and IEEE GLOBECOM.

Title:
From NICE to CAO-SIR: Evolution of Half Duplex Wireless Networks

Instructor:
Wei Chen, Tsinghua University, China

When I was a visiting PhD student in HKUST, there are two dreams in wireless communications, i.e., to develop topology-free network coding and to recover multiplexing loss in half duplex relaying. It takes a decade for us to realize the two dreams, which are inherently connected, as I will show in this talk. In particular, a topology free network coding method, referred to as network interference cancellation or NICE, will be presented. It can make use of the prior knowledge about the interference, which an interfered node can obtain by overhearing the signals from the source node, to cancel the inference from the relays of a multi-hop flow. Based on NICE, we further propose a channel aware successive relaying protocol, also referred to as CAO-SIR, which is capable of thoroughly mitigating the inter-relay interference induced by successive relaying, thereby achieving the diversity-multiplexing tradeoff of full duplex relaying asymptotically. In practice, NICE and CAO-SIR may benefit the evolution of half duplex wireless networks.

Biography of the instructor:

weichen
Wei Chen, Tsinghua University, China

Wei Chen (S’05-M’07-SM’13) received his BS and PhD degrees (both with the highest honors) from Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, in 2002, and 2007, respectively. From 2005 to 2007, he was also a visiting research staff in the Hong Kong University of Science & Technology. Since July 2007, he has been with Department of Electronic Engineering, Tsinghua University, where he is a tenured full professor of the new research and teaching track, a deputy department head, and University council member. He visited the University of Southampton, UK, from June 2010 to Sept. 2010, Telecom ParisTech, France, from June 2014 to Sept. 2014, and Princeton University, from July 2015 to Sept. 2015 and from Jan. 2016 to March 2016. His research interests are in the areas of wireless communications and information theory.

Title:
Achieving k-Channel-Connectivity with Topology Control in Cognitive Radio Networks

Instructor:
Min Sheng, Xidian University, China

In view of the unpredictable activities of primary users (PUs), connectivity guarantee is of vital importance for the cognitive radio network (CRN). Existing works ensure the connectivity of the CRN with only one channel reclaimed by PU, without considering a general case that PUs occupy multiple channels simultaneously, thereby resulting in a network partition. In this paper, we aim at guaranteeing the k-channel-connectivity of the CRN, which refers to maintain the CRN’s connectivity even when any k-1 channels are requested by PUs at the same time. Particularly, we achieve the target by ensuring that any k-1 independent sets (i.e., groups of SUs that transmit on the same channel) are not any vertex-cut set of the CRN. With that guidance, we firstly propose a topology control algorithm to minimize the number of channels required by the CRN, and to ensures that the topology remains k-channel-connected and conflict-free as well. Secondly, the correctness of the proposed algorithm is verified via theoretical analysis. Finally, extensive simulations are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of proposed algorithm. Simulation results show that our algorithm can not only enables the reductions of the required channels, but also the power consumption of the CRN.

Biography of the instructor:

MinSheng
Min Sheng, Xidian University, China

Min Sheng (M’03) received the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in communication and information systems from Xidian University, Shaanxi, China, in 2000 and 2004, respectively. She has been a faculty member of the School of Telecommunications Engineering at Xidian University since 2000, where she is currently a Full professor with the State Key Laboratory of ISN. Her current research interests include interference and resource management in heterogeneous networks, ultra dense networks (UDN), self-organizing networks (SON), big data processing, green communications, and satellite networks. She has published two books and over 130 papers in refereed journals and conference proceedings. She was awarded the Second Prize for the State Technological Innovation Award in 2014, the New Century Excellent Talents in University by the Ministry of Education of China, the Young Teachers Award from the Fok Ying-Tong Education Foundation, China, in 2008, and the Best Paper Award at IEEE/CIC ICCC 2013.

Session-5
Date: Friday July 29, 2016
Time: 11:00-12:30
Room: Sentosa Meeting Room, Wangjiang Club 4F
Chair: Lian Zhao (Ryerson University, Canada)

Title:
Cost Efficiency for Economical Mobile Data Traffic Management from Users’ Perspective

Instructor:
Lingyang Song, Beijing University, China

The explosive demand for wireless internet services has posed critical challenges for wireless network due to its limited capacity. To tackle this hurdle, wireless Internet service providers (WISPs) take the smart data pricing to manage the data traffic loads. Meanwhile, from the users’ perspective, it is also reasonable and desired to employ mobile data traffic management under the pricing policies of WISPs to improve the economic efficiency of data consumption. In this talk we introduce a concept of cost efficiency for user’s mobile data management, defined as the ratio of user’s mobile data consumption benefits and its expense. We propose an integrated cost-efficiency-based data traffic management scheme including long-term data demand planning, short-term data traffic pre-scheduling and real-time data traffic management. The real-time data traffic management algorithm is proposed to coordinate user’s data consumption to tailor to the pre-scheduled data traffic profile. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of cost efficiency framework in indicating and motivating mobile user’s data consumption behavior. The proposed management scheme can effectively motivate the user to adjust its data consumption profile to obtain the optimal data consumption cost efficiency.

Biography of the instructor:

Lingyang_Photo
Lingyang Song, Beijing University, China

Lingyang Song received his PhD from the University of York, UK, in 2007, where he received the K. M. Stott Prize for excellent research. He worked as a research fellow at the University of Oslo, Norway until rejoining Philips Research UK in March 2008. In May 2009, he joined the School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Peking University, China, as a full professor. His main research interests include MIMO, cognitive and cooperative communications, security, and big data.

Dr. Song is the co-author of two text books, “Wireless Device-to- Device Communications and Networks” and “Full-Duplex Communications and Networks” published by Cambridge University Press, UK. He is the co-recipient of 9 best paper awards and 1 best demo award, including IEEE Leonard G. Abraham Prize in 2016, best paper award from IEEE ICC 2014, IEEE Globecom 2014, IEEE ICC 2015, and the best demo award in the ACM Mobihoc 2015.

Dr. Song is currently on the Editorial Board of IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications. He served as tutorial co-chair of IEEE Globecom 2017, and symposium co-chair for IEEE ICC 2014, IEEE VTC 2016 Spring, IEEE ICC 2016, and IEEE Globecom 2016.

Dr. Song is the recipient of IEEE Asia Pacific (AP) Young Researcher Award in 2012. He a senior member of IEEE, and an IEEE distinguished lecturer since 2015.

Title:
Load Balancing for Smart Grid Applying Water-Filling Approach

Instructor:
Lian Zhao, Ryerson University, Canada

It is well-known that power demand is time-varying in a day. Demand Side Management (DSM) is a mechanism to increase the power stability and efficiency by scheduling elastic loads on demand side considering the user’s utility and/or electricity cost. Less power fluctuation in the power system indicates improved efficiency and safety operation of the power grid. Therefore, flattening the power consumLian Zhao, Ryerson University, Canadaption to achieve load balancing via DSM has attracted lots of research attention in recent years.

Water-filling (WF) algorithm is a well-known important tool for optimal radio resource management (RRM) in communication systems to maximize channel capacity when power is constrained. In this talk, water-filling approach is proposed to solve load balancing problem. We consider that the users are grouped into different groups. Each user has individual peak power constraint and each group has group peak power constraint due to different restrictions of the power loads used by the users and the groups. It will be shown that the optimal elastic power allocation to minimize the overall load fluctuation has the form of water-filling solution. We decompose the three dimension allocation problems into two dimension problems to gain tractability and provide optimal solutions efficiently.

The proposed load balancing algorithms possess scalability feature and provide exact optimal solutions based on non-derivative methods, as the implementation of the proposed algorithms invokes neither derivative nor gradient operations. Numerical results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed algorithms.

Biography of the instructor:

liang zhao
Lian Zhao, Ryerson University, Canada

Lian Zhao obtained her Ph.D. degree from University of Waterloo in 2002, joined the Department of ELCE, Ryerson University as an Assistant Professor in 2003, early tenured in 2006, and a Professor in 2013. Her research interests are in the areas of wireless communications, radio resource management, connected vehicles, load balancing in smart grid, etc.

Dr. Zhao contributed over 100 peer-reviewed journal and conference papers. She received Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) New Opportunity Research Award in 2005; Ryerson Faculty Merit Award in 2005 and 2007; Faculty Research Excellence Award in 2010, 2012, and 2014; Best Paper Award from IEEE Chinacom in 2011, and Best Paper Award from 2013 International Conference on Wireless Communications and Signal Processing, 2015 TOP 15 Editor for her Outstanding Contributions to IEEE Transaction on Vehicular Technology.

Dr. Zhao is a committee member for NSERC (Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada) Evaluation Group and an Editor for IEEE Transaction on Vehicular Technology. She served as workshop co-chair for IEEE/CIC ICCC 2015, local arrangement co-chair for IEEE Infocom 2014, symposium co-chair for IEEE Globecom 2013. She is an IEEE senior member and a registered professional engineer in the province of Ontario.

Title:
Transmitting Correlated Sources Using Energy Harvesting Transmitters

Instructor:
Yunquan Dong, Seoul National University, Korea

In an energy harvesting wireless sensor network (EH-WSN), an energy harvesting unit is used at each sensor node to collect energy from ambient environments. This provides the network with a perpetual energy supply. However, the intensity of the energy harvesting process is still limited. It is also noted that the collected samples by the sensor nodes are usually correlated with each other. To transmit the samples to the fusion center, they need to be compressed using distributed lossy source coding first.

In this talk, we consider a basic model in EH-WSNs where two correlated Gaussian sources are transmitted over additive white noise channels (AWGN) by two energy harvesting nodes. Under the squired distortion measure, we minimize the weighted sum-distortion by optimizing the transmit power of each node. By formulating this problem as a standard convex optimization problem, we investigate the structure of the optimal power allocation. Our analysis demonstrates that the transmit power of each node is increasing with the water level associated with itself, which is a monotone increasing function of time, while decreasing with that associated with the other node. To solve the convex optimization problem efficiently, we develop an iterative search algorithm called the iterative generalized backward-water-filling algorithm. Our numerical experiments show that the proposed algorithm is highly efficient and can converge to the optimal solution within a few iterations.

Biography of the instructor:

Yunquan dong
Yunquan Dong, Seoul National University, Korea

Yunquan Dong received his Ph.D. degree in Communication and Information Engineering from Tsinghua University in Jan. 2014, his M.S. degree in Communication and Information System from Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications (BUPT) in Apr. 2008, Beijing, China, and his B.S. degree from Qingdao University in July 2005, Qingdao, China. He was a lecturer with Qingdao University of Technology, Qingdao, China, from Mar. 2014. He joined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Seoul National University, Korea, as a BK assistant professor in Mar. 2015.

His research interests are in the area of wireless communication and information theory, including heterogeneous cellular networks and energy harvesting based communication systems. He received the Best Paper Award of IEEE ICCT in 2011. He received the National Scholarship for Postgraduates from China’s Ministry of Education in 2012, as well as two first class scholarship from Tsinghua University in 2012 and 2013, respectively. Upon his graduation, he received the Outstanding Graduate Award of Beijing with honors in 2014. He also received the Rising Star in the Area of Information Theory Award from China’s Information Theory Society in 2014.